Crowned by an eternal snow cap throughout the year, Mt. Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa [the roof top of Africa] and the tallest freestanding mountain on in the world at 5,895 metres above sea level located on area which lies between 2° 45′ to 3° 25’S and 37° 00′ to 37° 43’E. With its three volcanic cones, Kibo, Mawenzi and Shira, is a dormant volcanic mountain in Tanzania.

The first ascender was Ludwig Purtscheller in 1849, an Austrian mountaineer and teacher who in the 19th century did the entire route finding and lead climbing, and the followed by Hans Heinrich Josef Meyer in 1889, a German geographer from Hildburghausen, credited with being the first European to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.

Kilimanjaro is a worlds most accessible high summits, with climbers plan to reach the Crater rim, Uhuru [Freedom] Point, the actual summit, or Gillman's Point on the lip of the crater to earn their climbing certificates and their memories. Key attraction when climbing Mt Kilimanjaro includes the following features:-

Reaching its summits

Climatic world tour ranging from the tropics to the Arctic

Lush montane forest inhabited by animals

Moorland zone

Surreal alpine desert above 4, 000m supporting to mosses and lichen

Vestigial vegetation gives way to a winter wonderland of ice and snow

the magnificent beauty of the roof of the continent

Size

1668 sq km 641 sq miles [Kilimanjaro Nationa Park]
 

What to do

Hiking or trekking to the summit

Day or overnight hikes on the Shira plateau

Nature trails on the lower reaches

Trout fishing

When to go

December to February, clearest and warmest conditions

July to September, dry (and colder)

The major routes to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro include the:
Marangu | Machame | Umbwe | Mweka | Shira | Lemosho | Rongai | Arrow Glacier

 

For the details of the each trekking routes to the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro please view below.

MARANGU ROUTE

Length of hiking/trekking: 
5 days, 3 ascending and 2 descending
Location & Getting there: 
Located on eastern side of Moshi town about 33 km, about 1 hour drive from Moshi to Marangu main gate. Accessibility is by road to the main gate

Accommodation While Trekking:

Sleeping in Huts within the National Park

 

Marangu Route Itinerary:
Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro via Marangu route, starts at the Marangu Gate [1860 m above sea level] and it takes 5 days of climbing to the roof top of Africa.The itinerary for this route is as follows :-

Day 1 – Marangu Gate [1860 m above sea level] – Mandara Huts [2700m above sea level]
Walking distance: 8 kilometres
Walking time: 3-4 hours
Altitude gain: 840 m

Day 2 – Mandara Huts – Horombo Huts [3700 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 12 kilometres
Walking time: 5-7 hours
Altitude gain: 1000 m

Day 3 – Horombo Huts – Kibo Huts [4700 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 9.5 kilometres
Walking time: 5-7 hours
Altitude gain: 1000 m

Day 4 – Summit attempt via Gilman’s Point [5700 m above sea level] to Uhuru Peak [5895 m above sea level] and descending to Horombo Huts [3700 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5.5 kilometres ascending and 15 kilometres descending
Walking time: 5-6 hrs ascending to roof top, 1-2 hours stays up, 5-6 hours descending
Altitude gain: 1000 m [Gilman’s Point] or 1195 m [Uhuru Peak]
Descent: 2195 m

Day 5 – Horombo Huts – Marangu Gate
Walking distance: 20 kilometres
Walking time: 5 hours
Descent: 1840 m

 

 

MACHAME ROUTE

Macheme Route is most Climb Kilimanjaro on the Machame Route, the most popular route on Mount Kilimanjaro.

Length of hiking/trekking: 
6 – 7 days, 3 – 4 ascending and 2 descending

Location & Getting there: 
Located on western side of Moshi town about 45 minutes drive from Moshi to Machame main gate. Accessibility is by road to the main gate

Accommodation While Trekking: 
Sleeping in Campsites within the National Park

Machame Route Itinerary:
Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro via Machame route, starts at the Machame Gate [1830 m above sea level] and it takes 6 – 7 days of climbing to the roof top of Africa. The itinerary for this route is as follows :-

Day 1 – Machame Gate [1830 m above sea level] – Machame Huts [3030 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5.5 kilometres
Walking time: 5-7 hours
Altitude gain: 1200 m

Day 2 – Machame Huts – New Shira Camp [3850 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-6 hours
Altitude gain: 820 m

Day 3 – New Shira Camp – via Lava Tower [4640 m above sea level] – Barranco Huts [3985 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 10 kilometres
Walking time: 5-7 hours
Altitude gain: 135 m [790 m to Lava Tower]

Day 4 – Barranco Huts – Karanga Camp [4040 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 55 m

Day 5 – Karanga Camp – Barafu Huts [4680 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 3.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 640 m

Day 6 – Summit attempt via Stella Point [5752 m above sea level] to Uhuru Peak [5895 m above sea level) and descend to Millennium Camp [3820 m above sea level] [or to Mweka Hut]
Walking distance: 5 kilometres ascending and 10 kilometres descending
Walking time: 5-6 hrs ascending, 1-2 hours stays up, and 5-6 hours down
Altitude gain: 1072 m [Stella Point] or 1215 m [Uhuru Peak]
Descent: 2075 m

Day 7 – Millenium Camp – Machame Gate
Walking distance: 20 kilometres
Walking time: 5 hours
Descent: 1990 m

 

 

Shira Route

Length of hiking/trekking: 
6 – 7 days, 3 – 4 ascending and 2 descending

Location & Getting there: 
Located on eastern side of Moshi town about 4 hours drive from Moshi to Londorossi main gate. Accessibility is by road to the main gate

Accommodation While Trekking: 
Sleeping in Campsites within the National Park

Shira Route Itinerary:
Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro via Shira route, starts at the Londorossi Gate [2100 m above sea level] and it takes 6 – 7 days of climbing to the roof top of Africa. The itinerary for this route is as follows:-

Day 1 – Londorossi Gate – River Camp [3050 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 7 kilometres
Walking time: 4 hours
Altitude gain: 950 m

Day 2 – River Camp – Shira Huts [3850 m above sea level] via Shira Cathedral
Walking distance: 12 kilometres
Walking time: 6-8 hours
Altitude gain: 800 m

Day 3 – Shira Huts – via Lava Tower [4640 m above sea level] – Barranco Huts [3985 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 9 kilometres
Walking time: 6-8 hours
Altitude gain: 135 m [790 m to Lava Tower]

Day 4 – Barranco Huts – Karanga Camp [4040 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 55 m

Day 5 – Karanga Camp – Barafu Huts [4680 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 3.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 640 m

Day 6 – Summit attempt via Stella Point [5752 m above sea level] to Uhuru Peak [5895 m above sea level] and descent to Millennium Camp [3820 m above sea level] [or to Mweka Hut]
Walking distance: 5 kilometres ascending and 10 kilometres descending
Walking time: 5-6 hrs ascending, 1-2 hours stays up, and 5-6 hours down
Altitude gain: 1072 m [Stella Point] or 1215 m [Uhuru Peak]
Descent: 2075 m

Day 7 – Millenium Camp – Shira Gate
Walking distance: 20 kilometres
Walking time: 5 hours
Descent: 1990 m

 

 

LEMOSHO ROUTE

Length of hiking/trekking: 
6 – 7/8 days, 4 – 6 ascending and 2 descending

Location & Getting there: 
Located on eastern side of Moshi town about 4 hours drive from Moshi to Londorossi main gate. Accessibility is by road to the main gate

Accommodation While Trekking: 
Sleeping in Campsites within the National Park

Lemosho Route Itinerary:
Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro via Shira route, starts at the Londorossi Gate [2100 m above sea level] and it takes 7 – 8 days of climbing to the roof top of Africa. The itinerary for this route is as follows:-

Day 1 – Londorossi Gate – Big Tree Camp [2650 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 6 kilometres
Walking time: 2-3 hours
Altitude gain: 550 m

Day 2 – Big Tree Camp – Shira I [3480 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 8 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 830 m

Day 3 – Shira I – Shira Huts [3850 m above sea level] via Shira Cathedral
Walking distance: 11 kilometres
Walking time: 6-8 hours
Altitude gain: 370 m

Day 4 – Shira Huts – via Lava Tower [4640 m above sea level] – Barranco Huts [3985 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 9 kilometres
Walking time: 6-8 hours
Altitude gain: 135 m [790 m to Lava Tower]

Day 5 – Barranco Huts – Karanga Camp [4040 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 55 m

Day 6 – Karanga Camp – Barafu Huts [4680 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 3.5 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 640 m

Day 7 – Summit attempt via Stella Point [5752 m above sea level] to Uhuru Peak [5895 m above sea level] and descent to Millennium Camp [3820 m above sea level] [or to Mweka Hut]
Walking distance: 5 km ascending and 10 km descending
Walking time: 5-6 hrs ascending, 1-2 hours stays up, and 5-6 hours down
Altitude gain: 1072 m [Stella Point] or 1215 m [Uhuru Peak]
Descent: 2075 m

Day 8 – Millenium Camp – Lemosho Gate
Walking distance: 20 kilometres
Walking time: 5 hours
Descent: 1990 m

 

 

RONGAI ROUTE

Length of hiking/trekking: 
6 – 7 days, 3 – 4 ascending and 2 descending

Location & Getting there: 
Located on eastern side of Moshi town about 99.2 km, about 1 hour 35 minutes drive from Moshi to Nalemoru main gate. Accessibility is by road to the main gate

Accommodation While Trekking: 
Sleeping in Campsites within the National Park

Rongai Route Itinerary:
Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro via Shira route, starts at the Nalemoru Gate [1950 m above sea level] and it takes 6 days of climbing to the roof top of Africa. The itinerary for this route is as follows:-

Day 1 – Nalemoru [1950 m above sea level] – First Cave Campsite [2650 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 6.5 kilometres
Walking time: 3-4 hours
Altitude gain: 700 m

Day 2 – First Cave Campsite – Kikelewa Caves [3600 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 9 kilometres
Walking time: 6-7 hours
Altitude gain: 950 m

Day 3 – Kikelewa Caves – Mawenzi Tarn [4330 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 6 kilometres
Walking time: 3-4 hours
Altitude gain: 730 m

Day 4 – Mawenzi Tarn – Kibo Huts [4700 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 9 kilometres
Walking time: 4-5 hours
Altitude gain: 370 m

Day 5 – Summit attempt via Gilman’s Point [5700 m above sea level] to Uhuru Peak [5895 m above sea level] and descent to Horombo Huts [3700 m above sea level]
Walking distance: 5 kilometres ascending and 15 kilometres descending
Walking time: 5-6 hrs ascending, 1-2 hours stays up, and 5-6 hours down
Altitude gain: 1000 m [Gilman’s Point] or 1195 m [Uhuru Peak]
Descent: 2195 m

Day 6 – Horombo Huts – Marangu Gate
Walking distance: 20 kilometres
Walking time: 5 hours
Descent: 1840 m

 

 

Umbwe Route

Umbwe route is the steepest route of Mount Kilimanjaro. However, it can be used and only for people with mountain climbing experience, and usually it is recommended for 5 – 6 days.

Mweka Route

Mweka is not a climb route, it is used during descending if your climbing route to the top of Africa, Mt Kilimanjaro is Machame, Shira, Lemosho or Umbwe route.

General

Attitude Sickness

So when you read that there is a lack of oxygen at the summit, that’s not strictly true – oxygen still makes up 20% of the air. So the problem is not lack of oxygen – but the lack of air pressure.

To put it in more precise terms: atmospheric pressure drops by about tenth for every 1000m of altitude. Thus the air pressure at the top of Kilimanjaro is approximately 40% of that found at sea level.

In other words, and to put it in layman’s terms, though each breath inhaled at the summit is 20% oxygen, just as it is at sea level, it becomes much harder to fill your lungs since the atmosphere is not pushing so much air into them. As a result, every time you breathe on Kibo you take in only about half as much air, and thus oxygen, as you would if you took the same breath in Dar es Salaam.

Oxygen and us: the truth

This can, of course, be seriously detrimental to your health; oxygen is, after all, pretty essential to your physical well-being. All of your vital organs need it, as do your muscles. They receive their oxygen via red blood cells, which are loaded with oxygen by your lungs and then pumped around your body by your heart, delivering oxygen as they go. Problems arise at altitude when that most vital of organs, the brain, isn’t getting enough oxygen and malfunctions as a result; because as the body’s central control room, if the brain malfunctions, so does the rest of you, often with fatal consequences.

So how does a lack of oxygen lead to altitude sickness?

Fortunately, your body is an adaptable piece of machinery and can adjust to the lower levels of oxygen that you breathe in at altitude. Unconsciously you will start to breathe deeper and faster, your blood will thicken as your body produces more red blood cells, and your heart will beat faster. As a result, your essential organs will receive the same level of oxygen as they always did.

But your body needs time before it can effect all these changes. Though the deeper, faster breathing and heart-quickening happen almost as soon as your body realizes that there is less oxygen available, it takes a few days for the blood to thicken. And with Kilimanjaro, of course, a few days is usually all you have on the mountain, and the changes may simply not happen in time. The result, is AMS.

AMS, or acute mountain sickness (also known as altitude sickness), is what happens when the body fails to adapt in time to the lack of air pressure at altitude. There are three levels of AMS: mild altitude sickness, moderate altitude sickness and severe altitude sickness. On Kilimanjaro, it’s fair to say that most people will get some symptoms of the illness and will fall into the mild-to-moderate categories.

Having symptoms of mild AMS is not necessarily a sign that the sufferer should give up climbing Kili and descend immediately. Indeed, most or all of the symptoms suffered by those with mild AMS will disappear if the person rests and ascends no further, and assuming the recovery is complete, the assault on the summit can continue.

The same goes for moderate AMS too, though here the poor individual and his or her symptoms should be monitored far more closely to ensure that they are not getting any worse and developing into severe AMS. This is a lot more serious and sufferers with severe AMS should always descend immediately, even if it means going down by torchlight in the middle of the night.

Available Gear for hire in Moshi for Climbing Kilimanjaro

Prices are for the entire trek in U.S. dollars, 

Sleeping bag

 $20

Hat:

$5

Balaclava/Scarf:

$5

Fleece Pants:

$10

Warm Jacket:

$10

Long Underwear:

$5

Raincoat/Poncho:

$10

Rain Pants:

$10

Gloves:

$5

Sweater/Pullover:

$10

Socks:

$2

Hiking Boots:

$20

Sleeping Bag and Liner:

$30

Duffel Bag/Backpack:

$20

Rucksack/Daypack:

$10

Hiking Poles (2):

$10

Gaiters:

$10

Torch/Flashlight:

$10

Sunglasses:

$5

Batteries:

$3

Water Bottle:

$5

Binoculars:

$20

 

– Tents and foam sleeping pads are provided at no charge.
– Rental prices are subject to change.

Overview

Africa’s highest peak, and the tallest freestanding mountain in the world, ‘Kili’ as it’s affectionately known is in fact a long extinct volcano with its three cones rising high out of the African plains. Two of the peaks are dormant but a third, Kibo, shows signs of activity and is thought to still be live.

One of the features of Mt.Kilimanjaro that makes it so special is the different zones one passes through on an ascent. Technically the volcano is an Afromontane sky island, meaning unique flora and fauna exist there as a result of its isolation and altitude. It’s a biodiversity hot spot and the forests are full of birds and animals, so don’t forget to bring your camera and binoculars.

Kilimanjaro summit Trekkers will pass through eerie cloud forests on the lower slopes before traversing moorland and finally arriving at the snowy and rocky summit. Attempts on the summit usually set off during the night so that trekkers can reach the peak as the sun rises and have time to get back down again.

In reality one does not so much climb Kilimanjaro as walk or trek up in. There are six different paths of ascent with the Marangu route being one of the easier ones and taking around five days and staying in huts or tents along the route.

A reasonable degree of fitness is required to trek up Kilimanjaro, but an overwhelming majority of people have no problem reaching the summit.

Mount Kilimanjaro viewThe view of the mountain in Tanzania.

 

Sample Food on Kilimanjaro

The menu on Kilimanjaro is designed to ensure your food intake matches your level of exertion. It will provide you with a good balance of protein, carbohydrates, fruit and vegetables. When you are at altitude you could start to feel nauseous and your appetite may be suppressed, so the meals prepared at high altitude usually contain more carbohydrates and less protein to help you to digest your food.

Your meals will be prepared by your cooks on Kilimanjaro and the food will be carried by your porters.

A typical day’s menu will include the following:

Breakfast

Porridge

Toast

Pancakes

Eggs

Smoked sausages

Fresh fruit (pinapple, melon or oranges)

Tea / Coffee / hot chocolate

Lunch

Sandwiches

Fresh fruit

Hard boiled eggs

Biscuits

Fruit juice

Dinner

Soup

Pasta / Rice / Potatoes

Chicken / Beef

Vegetables

Salad

Fresh fruit

Snacks

You may wish to bring your own snacks to provide well deserved treat, or energy boost! Chocolate is generally the best answer and if it has nuts in then even better, but whatever you choose make sure it is a favourite treat and not a ‘power bar’, or ‘energy gel’. If you are suffering from altitude sickness then your appetite may be suppressed and these snacks may become a good supplement to your meals, so make sure it is something that you enjoy eating! A powdered energy drink such as lucozade sport is also a good source of energy and will help with the taste of the water if you have been using iodine tablets.

Climbing Checklist

You are responsible for bringing personal gear and equipment while communal equipment (tents, food, cooking items, etc.) is provided. Below is a gear list of required, recommended and optional items to bring on your climb.

Technical Clothing

1 – Waterproof Jacket, breathable with hood
1 – Insulated Jacket, synthetic or down
1 – Soft Jacket, fleece or soft-shell
2 – Long Sleeve Shirt, light-weight, moisture-wicking fabric
1 – Short Sleeve Shirt, light-weight, moisture-wicking fabric
1 – Waterproof Pants, breathable (side-zipper recommended)
2 – Hiking Pants (convertible to shorts recommended)
1 – Fleece Pants
1 – Shorts (optional)
1 – Long Underwear (moisture-wicking fabric recommended)
3 – Underwear, briefs (moisture-wicking fabric recommended)
2 – Sport Bra (women)

Equipment

1 – Sleeping Bag, warm, four seasons
1 – Sleeping Bag Liner, for added warmth (optional)
1 – Trekking Poles (recommended)
1 – Head lamp, with extra batteries
1 – Duffel bag, (waterproof recommended) for porters to carry your equipment
1 – Daypack, for you to carry your personal gear

Handwear

1 – Gloves, warm (waterproof recommended)
1 – Glove Liners, thin, synthetic, worn under gloves for added warmth (optional)

Footwear

1 – Hiking Boots, warm, waterproof, broken-in, with spare laces
1 – Gym Shoes, to wear at camp (optional)
3 – Socks, thick, wool or synthetic
3 – Sock Liners, tight, thin, synthetic, worn under socks to prevent blisters (optional)
1 – Gaiters, waterproof (optional)

Accessories

1 – Sunglasses or Goggles
1 – Backpack Cover, waterproof (optional)
1 – Poncho, during rainy season (optional)
1 – Water Bottle (Nalgene, 32 oz. recommended)
1 – Water Bladder, Camelbak type (recommended)
1 – Towel, lightweight, quick-dry (optional)
1 – Pee Bottle, to avoid leaving tent at night ( recommended)
Stuff Sacks or Plastic Bags, various sizes, to keep gear dry and separate

Headwear

1 – Brimmed Hat, for sun protection
1 – Knit Hat, for warmth
1 – Balaclava, for face coverage (optional)
1 – Bandana (optional)

Other

Toiletries
Prescriptions
Sunscreen
Lip Balm
Insect Repellent, containing DEET
First Aid Kit
Hand Sanitizer
Toilet Paper
Wet Wipes (recommended)
Snacks, light-weight, high calorie, high energy (optional)
Pencil and Notebook, miniature, for trip log (optional)
Camera, with extra batteries (optional)

Paperwork

Trip Receipt
Passport
Visa (available at JRO)
Immunization Papers
Insurance Documents

F.A.Q. on KILIMANJARO CLIMBING

We handle all sorts of Individual & group requests and can help you customize the perfect trek whatever you or you group size or needs.Our team is standing by 24/7 to assist from the time you inquire about a trek until the last day. Our goal is to ensure everyone has a great trekking experience.

 Health and safety... Who Can Go... Preparations... About The Trek... Room And Board...  Health and safety...

What physical criteria will ensure I'm fit enough to trek?

You should be in good enough shape to walk continuously throughout the day. Good overall fitness, flexibility, and healthy will ensure you trek safely and comfortably. Those with acute or chronic health conditions impacting their stamina, range of motion, coordination, or balance may have difficulty completing the trek. If you are in doubt about your own physical readiness, consult a physician well in advance of booking your trip! General hiking experience and comfort with the idea of multi-day hiking will also ensure you are 100% ready to trek!

How will we deal with altitude acclimation?

The best scenario is to acclimatize slowly. The trekking trips up Kilimanjaro is a fairly rapid ascent and trekkers should report any problems to their guide. Common symptoms of mountain sickness include headaches and cough.

Why is a guide necessarily? I've trekked/hiked/camped before - can't I guide myself?

Guides are a requirement on Kilimanjaro set by the Tanzania National Park Service

What do I need to know about sun protection?

It may seem counter-intuitive, but your skin is in more danger of sun damage on the mountains than while at the beach! The sun’s intensity increases dramatically as we rise in altitude, and fresh snow reflects exponentially more UV rays than does the sand. You will need to protect your skin with clothing and sunblock. A sunblock specifically for mountain conditions is recommended. If you wear prescription eyeglasses its recommend that you get your prescription fitted to sunglasses.

What happens if I get sick or injured while trekking?

We take all possible precautions to proactively ensure the safety and wellness of our trekkers, but rest assured that our guides are trained and experienced in dealing with emergencies. Each guide is trained in first aid. In the case of altitude sickness, you will immediately be taken to a lower altitude. If necessary, your guide will utilize the park rescues services for immediate evacuation.

Are solo female travelers safe climbing Kilimanjaro?

Yes, we ensure the travel safety of all our trekking guests, both male and female. We have longstanding, strong relationships with the lodges we frequent, and know them to be safe and reliable. In addition our guides are consistently mindful of all guests' whereabouts while trekking. We travel in small groups, all the better to easily maintain continual contact.

Age

The official age limit set by the Kilimanjaro National Park Authority for climibing Uhuru Peak is 10 years old, we usually recommend a minimum age of 13 years. If anyone in your group is under 16 years of age please inform us in advance so arrangements can be made.

How difficult is climbing Kilimanjaro?

The trek to the Barafu Hut is only moderately difficult with a good trail with the only really steep point being the Barranco Wall. The final push to the the summit ridge takes about 6 hours and is very steep and cold. This last steep section is mostly switchbacks and then some easy rock scrambling near the top. Your guide will set a very slow pace. Most reasonably fit individuals can make it so long as they are not having any difficulty acclimatizing.

Why is a guide necessarily? I've trekked/hiked/camped before - can't I guide myself?

Guides are a requirement on Kilimanjaro set by the Tanzania National Park Service

Is previous trekking experience really necessary?

While it’s not technically required it's a good idea. Kilimanjaro is not the easiest trek and its good to have some previous experience and know what you are getting into and what trekking is.

What should I pack for my trip?

We have a complete packing list or if you want more details you can always contact us and we will be glad to give you further assistance on packaging matters.

What type of insurance should I have? Where can I obtain a policy?

Your park entrance fee includes cost of rescue off the mountain which will be organized by the Tanzanian National Park Service in conjunction with our team. In addition, it is strongly recommended that you have adequate travel insurance. While the park service will provide rescue services your travel insurance will cover any cost related to cancellation charges, unexpected curtailment of your holiday, medical and repatriation expenses including air ambulance, personal accident, delay loss or damage to your personal effects. If you don't have it already we recommend either Cover More or World Nomads.

Are any permits required for climbing Kilimanjaro?

Permits are required and included in the cost of the trek. You will get your permit at the gate on the first day of the trek.

What sort of footwear is recommended?

A good pair of hiking boots are important for the final climb as they help to keep your feet warm and provide adequate ankle support. Tennis shoes are sufficient on the other days of the trek.

Should I tip my guide? How about my porter?

Before climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, most climbers often start worrying about the porter and guide’s tip before the climb starts. They want to know how much it will affect their budget, and to make sure they are paying a good tip. barafu tours and safaris philosophy is just like service in a restaurant, a climbing tip should only be given if you received good service from us. Visit our porter tipping page for more info about tips.

How much money should I bring along?

You should bring enough to cover the tips at the end of the trek. Other than that our treks are all-inclusive. We cover accommodation, food, park fees, permits, and many other costs, as a means of making your adventure as stress-free and convenient as possible. Previously, it was possible to buy snacks and other items on the trek but the park service has eliminated all vendors and once you get on the mountain there are no opportunities to spend any money.

What communication options exist while trekking?

Your guide should be able to arrange a phone call or to get a message relayed in the case of emergency. Don’t expect any communication options although it is possible you will have cell signal in some locations.

How long do we spend walking each day?

The typical time spent walking is about 5 to 6 hours. On the summit day you will spend 12 to 16 hours trekking. However, you will be given a few hours to rest at Barafu so that this long day of trekking is broken into two parts. We make the summit push and decent all in one day to avoid acclimatization problems.

What kinds of accommodations are available on Kilimanjaro?

We offer tented camping on the Machame Route. Your camp crew will set up the tents before you arrive. Tents are on twin sharing and private tents may be available for individuals travelling alone. You will need to bring your own sleeping bag.

Will my mobile phone work? What about internet access?

Your mobile service may work at one or two points on the mountain but don’t count on it. We have tested mobile internet cards from both Vodacom (Tanzania) and Safaricom (Kenya) and were not able to access the internet. If you have a phone call that needs to be made during the trek please speak with your guide and he may be able to arrange something.

Can I charge my phone or camera during the trek?

' The Machame Route does not have any charging points available so bring spare batteries.

Where will our drinking water come from?

Drinking water is obtained on the mountain and then boiled before it is provided to you. Disposable plastic water bottles are not allowed on the mountain.

What about showers?

Your guide can provide you with a bucket of hot water both in the evening and the morning for washing.

Where do we eat our meals?

Lunch are packed and eaten on the trail during the day. You will take lunch and dinner in the dinning tents that are set up.

if you want to know more visit our Frequently Asked Question(FAQ) Page, and you can always contact us for further information and advice. THANK YOU ...!!

Galaries